News

Ruth Pastine in group show Fierce Generosity 2.0 opening Sept. 14 at Burnet in Wayzata

September 11, 2019 - Jason Jenkins

Burnet Fine Art & Advisory’s newest exhibition “Fierce Generosity 2.0” will open Saturday, Sept. 14, in its gallery at 775 Lake St. E., Wayzata. There will be a free opening reception 6-8 p.m. with an artist talk at 6:30 p.m.

“Fierce Generosity 2.0” was curated and organized by the Carolyn Glasoe Bailey Foundation, a nonprofit based in Ojai, California. The exhibition showcases a selection of work by Rob Fischer, Cole M. James, Yassi Mazandi, Ruth Pastine, David Rathman and Aaron Spangler. 

The Skate Park as a Vessel to Contain Emptiness and the Imagination

September 10, 2019 - Tyler Stallings

“Empty Vessel” presents two new bodies of photographs by Amir Zaki featuring either vacant landscapes of skate parks or still-lives of shards from broken, ceramic containers. The shards are clearly from earthenware pots, but both subjects are “vessels” in that the skate parks are sunken into the clay of the earth. Hung in proximity to one another, sometimes juxtaposed, the images generate a complex conversation around the notion of “emptiness,” which includes removing presuppositions from one’s mind about what one is about to experience, is experiencing, or has experienced. By disentangling the mind of one’s own stories and worries, one can be open to other possibilities presented by perception itself. Thus Zaki’s “Empty Vessel,” as an exhibition, provides a platform for contemplating duality and the more ambiguous third space that exists between linked elements which cannot exist without each other: form and emptiness; function and aesthetics; holding and letting go; containing and emptying.

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Lester Monzon: Fail Better | Exhibition Review

August 29, 2019 - Eve Wood

I’ve always been partial to exhibitions with oddly self-depreciating titles, and Lester Monzon’s Fail Better is definitely a doozie. A phrase from Samuel Beckett’s novella, Worstward Ho, the original quote reads “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better,” which is not a piece of inspirational writing at all but an absurdist’s response to the absurdity of the living world, i.e. a call to embrace the void. The title also brings to mind the angst and struggle inherent in the artistic process, as any creative person understands — each piece is not necessarily successful, but it is the endless process of transformation, not toward any specific conclusion but more in keeping with the steady work of a brick layer, plodding along year after year, slowly building a comprehensive vision of the world, that continues to inspire. Thus the title, as with the works themselves, reflect the intense and sometimes painful process of creating anything.

Read Full Review on Riot Material.

Navigating California’s concrete skateparks through the lens of Amir Zaki

August 21, 2019 - Luke Halls

Hawk and American-Australian designer Peter Zellner preface a new photographic tome by American artist Amir Zaki, California Concrete: A Landscape of Skateparks. The book documents 12 of the state’s most symbolic skating hotspots from San Diego to Sacramento, which came to be adopted by the modern Californian skating community from the 1970s onwards.

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California's "elaborately designed" concrete skateparks captured by Amir Zaki

August 20, 2019 - Eleanor Gibson

Jagged tunnels edged with red trim, scooped walls and wave-like canopies are among the defining features of these vacant concrete skateparks in California, photographed by artist Amir Zaki. The images feature in the California Concrete, a Landscape of Skateparks publication, and document 12 unusual and elaborate skateparks in city's across the state. 

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Ramp It Up! Amir Zaki Captures Quiet California Skateparks

August 20, 2019 - LeVar Thomas

Though I’m a spectator, the ramps at some skate parks look really exciting. I would imagine that goes double for skaters that brave those loops, ramps, rails and outcrops for a chance at glory. They likely imagine the possibilities that each ramp provides, which is a testament to the architects who make them.Photographer Amir Zaki must agree, and set out to document some elaborate architecture in the skateparks of California. Documenting the parks for California Concrete, Zaki beat skaters to the parks on early mornings to capture the sports monuments.

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Patti Oleon's artwork featured in new book, Ribbon of Darkness: Inferencing from the Shadowy Arts and Sciences

August 15, 2019

Patti Oleon's artwork is featured in a new book by Barbara Maria Stafford, Ribbon of Darkness: Inferencing from the Shadowy Arts and Sciences.

 

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Group Show "Vernacular Environments, Part 3 at Edward Cella Art & Architecture

July 18, 2019

Edward Cella Art & Architecture is hosting “Vernacular Environments, Part 3,” the third of an annual exhibition that explores a diversity of tensions between the figure and the environment.

On view through August 24, 2019, the exhibition features work by David Alekhuogie, Allan Bennetts, Daniel Cummings, Kirsten Deirup, Adriene Jenik, Erik Hanson, Shannon Lucy, Constance Mallinson, Thomas McDonell, Syd Mead, and Wendy Red Star.

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You've Never Seen Skate Parks Like This Before (Amir Zaki's California Concrete)

July 1, 2019 - Michael Hardy

When you think of skateboard photography, you probably picture a skater flying through the air while performing some recondite feat of physical wizardry. In Amir Zaki's photographs, though, skaters themselves are nowhere to be seen. Zaki grew up skating in Beaumont, California, and has the greatest respect for practitioners of the sport. But when he turned his own camera on the skate parks of his home region, his interest was more in the parks than the skating. Read more.

Chapelle de Poulet AN ESSAY IN XIII PIECES

June 25, 2019 - Jeffrey Vallance

In 1978 artist Jeffrey Vallance bought a frozen fryer chicken at the Ralph’s Supermarket in Canoga Park, California. He later buried the chicken at the Los Angeles Pet Cemetery after a brief memorial service. He also installed a grave marker for the frozen bird, naming her Blinky the Friendly Hen. This seriocomic artwork has taken the concept and processes of documentation to its most absurd conclusion. The piece became the quintessential conceptual artwork of the 1970s and Vallance’s straightforward approach offers a striking commentary on our society, the treatment of animals, spirituality and death. The year 2018 marked the 40th anniversary of Vallance’s Blinky project and, in celebration of this historic event, Vallance has released The Special 40th Anniversary Edition of the publication, Blinky (published in 2019 by California State University, Northridge Art Galleries) in conjunction with an exhibition at CSUN featuring a Blinky Chapel, Reliquary Chamber, Theatre, Poultry Gift Shop and “Free Range” a group show including over 80 international artists. Below, we’ve Vallance’s reflections on the sanctity of the chicken—a study of the chicken as a catechistic carrion vehicle for the serious study of spirituality in thirteen pieces. Click through the titles to take the essay piece by piece

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