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Lynn Aldrich

Review: AEQAI

March 2, 2016 - Anise Stevens

Farewell, Eden, at the Descanso Garden's Sturt Haaga Gallery
February 22 - April 3, 2016

The Clash of Nature and the Human Imprint in "Farewell, Eden"
"During the 19th century, landscape painting was a popular form of expression for artists to celebrate mankind’s dominion over nature. Pastoral scenes of manicured lawns, tamed gardens and ripe harvests depicted a peaceful, almost perfect world where man and nature thrived in harmonious union.

Currently on view at Descanso Garden’s Sturt Haaga Gallery, “Farewell, Eden” presents us with a much different perspective. Now that our ecosystem has been severely compromised after years upon years of so-called human progress, our old, romantic notions about nature no longer apply as an accurate representation of our planet’s health. Comprising 62 pieces by 13 Los Angeles based artists, “Farewell, Eden” poignantly articulates this reality across three gallery spaces, each of which afford viewers visual contact with the surrounding gardens." 

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Interview: ARTS Journal

December 1, 2015 - John Shorb

"JS:Yes, there’s the notion that everything the artist touches might have value, or that the artist acts out of a higher plane.

LA:Definitely, there can be this aura around the artist. It’s connected to ideas about the Bohemian, someone who breaks social taboos, who lives outside the norm. And Conceptualism was a response to that—those artists wanted to bring art back down to earth after pure abstraction and introspective expressionism. That’s one reason why I like Robert Smithson a lot. I love “Monuments of Passaic” where Smithson goes out and declares the various rusty industrial ruins along the river as today’s grand monuments."

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Review: Los Angeles Times

November 6, 2015 - Leah Ollman

Lynn Aldrich: More Light Than Heat
October 24 - December 5, 2015 

"The fabrics gradate from black, at the bottom, through browns, purples, violets, pinks and golds up to pale lemon and white at the top. Through her deft use of materials, Aldrich has, indeed, staged an ascension, elevating the lowbrow genre of velvet painting into a vehicle of greater profundity, while symbolically suggesting the Ascension, Christ's rise from earthly body to heavenly spirit."

Artist Profile: Art Ltd

November 6, 2015 - George Melrod

Lynn Adlrich: More Light Than Heat
October 24 - December 5, 2015

"Parading their humble pedigree, the artworks of Los Angeles sculptor Lynn Aldrich can seem almost casual at first. Don't be folled. Precisely compsoed out of largely ordinary materials, each of her sculptures is a self-contained statement of discovery and transcendence." 

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Review: Artsy Editorial

November 4, 2015 - Rachel Will

Lynn Aldrich: More Light Than Heat
October 24 - Decmeber 5, 2015

"Think back to the beginning of the original “Light and Space Movement”—it’s not the West Coast Minimal art movement the 1960s and ’70s, Lynn Aldrich would argue, but rather the stained glass windows found in cathedrals across Western Europe. This original play on light is something that inspired painters during the late Middle Ages, and also serves as a driving inspiration behind works in Aldrich’s latest show, “More Light Than Heat,” at Edward Cella Art + Architecture." 

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Review: Art Scene Magazine

October 28, 2015 - Liz Goldner

Lynn Aldrich: More Light Than Heat 
October 24 - December 5, 2015

"In 'More LightThan Heat,' Lynn Aldrich transforms Duchampian ready made materials bought in hardware, craft and office supply stores into constructions that have transcendent and spiritual qualities. The pieces in this show, all completed this year, represent an evolutionfor the artist, whose sculptural works of the past two decades havetended to possess more whimsical and homespun aspects."

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Review: Artillery Magazine

January 7, 2014 - John David O'Brien

Lynn Aldrich: Un/Common Objects at Art Center College of Design, October 11 - January 19, 2015. 

"The constituent parts— scouring pads, synthetic sponges, and other kitchen cleaning items—which are products of the petroleum economy, jeopardize the oceanic life forms they evoke. Aldrich’s mimesis of biological forms using synthetic materials almost makes us forget as it beguiles. In this sense, Aldrich’s politics are never abrupt or confrontational; rather, they are subversive and even a bit furtive."

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Review: Los Angeles Times

December 16, 2013 - Sharon Mizota

Lynn Aldrich: Un/Common Objects, October 11, 2013 through January 19 2014.

"The strength of Aldrich's work is this ability to find wonder and whimsy in the pre-set categories by which consumer culture defines and segments our lives."

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Review: Art Scene Magazine

November 1, 2013 - Diane Calder

Lynn Aldrich: Un/Common Objects, October 11, 2013 through January 19 2014.

"Stand behind Lynn Aldrich in a Home Depot checkout line and you may begin to wonder whatshe is building with 'all that stuff.' An Art Center College of Design MFA grad who studied withfaculty members Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe, Stephen Prina and Mike Kelley in the 1980’s, Aldrichhas become skilled in transforming 'do it yourself' materials, with all of their suggestions ofartificiality and consumerism, into works of art capable of inspiring people to examine theirimprint on nature’s ecosystem."

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Artist Profile: The Dotted Line

October 11, 2013 - Terri Bond

Lynn Aldrich: Un/Common Objects, October 11, 2013 through January 19 2014.

The sacred and the mundane: Lynn Aldrich’s witty spin on consumerism in Art Center College of Design's The Dotted Line

"By making these sorts of archaic physical objects that one has to walk around in reality and be near to experience," says Aldrich, "I‘m attempting to call attention to your physicality in a world that is more and more in a cloud of information."

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